Japan’s PM visits fish market, vows to help fisheries hit by China ban over Fukushima water release

Japan’s PM visits fish market, vows to help fisheries hit by China ban over Fukushima water release

In order to evaluate the effects of China’s ban on Japanese seafood in response to the release of treated radioactive wastewater from the damaged.

Fukushima Daiichi plant to the sea, Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida tried some seafood and spoke with workers at Tokyo’s Toyosu fish market on Thursday.

The treated wastewater has been released, and it is anticipated that this will continue for decades.

It was opposed by fishing organizations in Japan and the surrounding nations, and as a result, China promptly stopped all imports of seafood from Japan.

One of the owners of a seafood company told Kishida that since the treated water release, sales of his scallops, which are primarily exported to China, have fallen by 90%.

After visiting the market, Kishida told reporters, “We will prepare assistance measures that stand by the fishery operators.” “We will also firmly demand that Beijing end its trade sanctions, which lack any rationale.”

Japan’s PM visits fish market

Even before the water discharge and its restriction, China had increased testing on Japanese fisheries products, leading to protracted delays at customs.

Officials from the Japanese Fisheries Agency claimed that the action has had an impact on fish prices and sales not only from Fukushima but also from as far away as Hokkaido.

To boost struggling exporters and seek for new markets in Europe and the US, government officials have urged Japanese consumers to eat more scallops.

Officials and the operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, claim that all seawater and fish sampling data since the leak had radioactive levels that are much below established safety standards.

Hirokazu Matsuno, the chief cabinet secretary.

Alluded to the possibility of bringing the matter to the World Trade Organization on Wednesday. He stated that without any supporting evidence.

Japan had previously raised concerns about China’s trade restrictions, and that it would “examine various possibilities while continuing to work within the WTO system to decide required steps.” Yoshimasa Hayashi, Japan’s foreign minister, emphasized the value of communication.

Tourism has been impact by China’s ban on Japanese seafood. Tetsuo Saito, the minister of transport and tourism.

Has stated that there have been an increasing number of cancellations of Chinese tour groups and inquiries regarding the safety of the food in Japan, and that officials are monitoring the issue.

According to officials and reports, the Foreign Ministry, the operator of the nuclear facility. And thousands of Fukushima government offices have been the focus of prank phone calls from China.

Japan has also seen an increase in negative emotions.

A Chinese Vlogger in Tokyo noticed a sign at a Japanese-style bar advising “the Chinese” that it only serves cuisine from Fukushima and reported it to the police, alleging discrimination. While changing the sign, the owner remained silent.

Since the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that destroyed the facility and resulted. In meltdowns in three of its reactors, radioactive wastewater has accumulated.

Due to leakage and the use of cooling water, the 1.34 million tons of water. Which is kept in around 1,000 tanks, keeps building up.

In order to evaluate the effects of China’s ban on Japanese seafood. In response to the release of treated radioactive wastewater from the damaged.

Japan’s PM visits fish market

Fukushima Daiichi plant to the sea, Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida tried some seafood and spoke with workers at Tokyo’s Toyosu fish market on Thursday.

The treated wastewater has been release, and it is anticipate that this will continue for decades. It was oppose by fishing organizations in Japan.

The surrounding nations, and as a result, China promptly stopped all imports of seafood from Japan.

One of the owners of a seafood company told Kishida that since the release of treated water. Sales of his scallops, which are primarily export to China, have fallen by 90%.

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